Muuguzi Kiongozi kitengo tiba na matunzo katika hospitali ya Rufaa ya Bugando jijini Mwanza, Sarah Bipa akisalimiana na waratibu wa huduma za afya ngazi ya jamii walioambatana na Waviu washauri waliotembelea hospitali hiyo. 

Waviu Washauri kutoka mkoa wa Mwanza wametembelea vituo vikubwa vya tiba na matunzo katika hospitali ya Rufaa ya Bugando na Sekotoure jijini Mwanza ili kujifunza kwa kuona huduma mbalimbali zinazotolewa katika maeneo hayo.

Waviu washauri ni watu wanaoishi na maambukizi ya virusi vya Ukimwi na wamejiweka wazi na huru kuwashauri watu wanaoishi na VVU kuhusu mambo mbalimbali ya afya ikiwemo ufuasi mzuri wa dawa, kutoa ushauri nasaha,kufundisha kwa njia ya ushuhuda wa maisha yao na kuhamasisha Waviu kujiunga katika vikundi ili kusaidiana na kupunguza unyanyapaa.

Shirika la Ariel Glaser Pediatric Aids Healthcare Initiative( AGPAHI) linalojihusisha na mapambano dhidi ya Virusi Vya Ukimwi (VVU) na UKIMWI limetoa warsha kwa Waviu Washauri kutoka mkoa wa Mwanza ili kuwajengea uwezo kwa ajili ya kuboresha huduma katika vituo vya tiba na matunzo (CTC).

 

 Mwezeshaji, Gladness Olotu akitoa mada ukumbini.

Warsha hiyo ya siku tatu iliyoanza siku ya Jumanne Novemba 28,2017 katika ukumbi wa JB Belmont Hotel jijini Mwanza imekutanisha WAVIU washauri kutoka halmashauri za wilaya za Ilemela,Kwimba,Magu,Buchosa,Misungwi,Sengerema na Nyamagana.

"Waviu washauri" ni watu wanaoishi na maambukizi ya virusi vya Ukimwi na wamejiweka wazi na huru kuwashauri watu wanaoishi na VVU katika nyanja mbalimbali ikiwemo ufuasi mzuri wa dawa, kutoa ushauri nasaha kwa wenzao,kujitolea kufuatilia  na kufundisha kwa njia ya ushuhuda wa maisha sambamba na kuhamasisha Waviu kujiunga katika vikundi ili kusaidiana na kupunguza unyanyapaa.

 

Mgeni rasmi, Mratibu wa watoa huduma ngazi ya jamii mkoa wa Mwanza, Bi. Esperance Makuza,aliyemwakilisha Mratibu wa Ukimwi mkoa wa Mwanza akifungua warsha ya siku tatu ya watu wanaoishi na maambukizi ya Virusi vya Ukimwi mkoa wa Mwanza katika ukumbi wa JB Belmont Hotel jijini Mwanza Jumanne Novemba 28,2017

International Day of the Girl Child: Helping Girls Pursue Their Dreams

By Deborah Birx on October 10, 2017 On the International Day of the Girl Child – and every day – the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) celebrates the extraordinary power and potential of girls around the world, and we reaffirm our commitment to helping them pursue their dreams.

Empowering, supporting, and protecting girls is critical to controlling and ultimately ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Unless we deliver for girls, we will not succeed. This means understanding the unique challenges faced by girls and developing creative solutions to address them.

Over the past three and a half years, PEPFAR has taken these challenges head-on. In 2014, we partnered with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Girl Effect, Johnson & Johnson, Gilead Sciences, and ViiV Healthcare to launch DREAMS (Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, Safe). Driven by data, we have rolled out an unprecedented and comprehensive package of interventions in the highest-burden areas of 10 African countries.

We have seen girls step up as leaders in their communities to speak openly about their risks for HIV and embrace programs to reduce them. We have seen parents gain the skills to talk honestly with their daughters (and sons) about HIV and other health issues affecting their lives. We have witnessed community and faith leaders dedicating themselves to changing harmful gender norms that contribute to the vulnerability of girls and young women.

According to results from PEPFAR’s Population-based HIV Impact Assessments (PHIAs) in Lesotho, Malawi, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, we are approaching epidemic control among older adults in these countries. Yet the PHIAs also reveal key gaps for young women and men under age 35 who are significantly less likely to be tested, on treatment, and/or virally suppressed than those over age 35. And girls remain up to 14 times more likely to be infected with HIV than boys of their same age. With the rising population of adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa and a persistent cycle of HIV transmission between adolescent girls and young women and men 8-10 years older, we still have much work to do.

This year, for the first time, we integrated our DREAMS programs (which were previously funded centrally) into our annual Country Operational Plans, making DREAMS a core component of PEPFAR programs in the 10 original DREAMS countries. The DREAMS Innovation Challenge is also fully operational, supporting new ideas and approaches, many at the community level, to reach and support adolescent girls and young women. We also expanded DREAMS-like programming into Botswana, Cote D’Ivoire, Haiti, Namibia, and Rwanda.  

Our private sector partners remain central to the success of DREAMS, bringing their unique capacities and capabilities to the table. For example, Girl Effect conducted extensive research to understand the context of relationships between boys and girls in Malawi and what kind of messaging would resonate most with adolescents. It found that relationships between boys and girls are highly sexualized in Malawi, and society often discourages boys and girls from being platonic friends, which puts girls at greater risk. Girl Effect created a youth brand called “Zathu” (meaning “ours”) that aims to close the gender gap through the power of music and storytelling, tackling challenging topics such as relationships, confidence, and friendships between girls and boys.

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