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FAQ

CATEGORY 2: CHILDREN AND HIV

Who should parents and guardians tell about a child’s HIV infection?

The child’s health care providers need to know that the child has HIV in order to provide the best possible…

The child’s health care providers need to know that the child has HIV in order to provide the best possible care. Providers include doctors, nurses, dentists, and other medical employees.

The law does not require parents and guardians to share HIV-related information with a child’s school. However, it may be in the child’s best interest for some school employees to know about the child’s HIV infection (for example, if the child needs help taking medicines).

Parents and guardians of children with HIV should also think about whether to share their child’s HIV status with people directly involved in the child’s life, such as babysitters, friends, and relatives. They do not have to tell anyone. However, it may be overwhelming to care for a young person with HIV/AIDS without telling others and getting support.

Parents and guardians should consider:

  • How disclosure would be helpful to the child;
  • How disclosure would be helpful to the parents or guardians; and
  • Whether others can be trusted with this confidential information.
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Can a child with HIV infect another child through casual contact, fighting, or contact sports?

HIV is not passed through casual contact like hugging, touching, or sharing toys. It is highly unlikely that a child…

HIV is not passed through casual contact like hugging, touching, or sharing toys. It is highly unlikely that a child could get HIV through fighting or contact sports. The external contact with blood that might occur in a sports injury or through a fight is very different from the direct entry of someone else’s blood into your bloodstream that occurs from sharing needles or drug works.

Posted 1 year agoby admin

Should a child with HIV get regular childhood immunizations?

Yes. Immunizations are important for all children. However, the schedule of immunizations is different for children with HIV, so it…

Yes. Immunizations are important for all children. However, the schedule of immunizations is different for children with HIV, so it is important to tell the health care provider that the child has HIV. Also, vaccines given to an infant or child with HIV may become less effective over time as the child’s immune system gets weaker. So, a child with HIV who is exposed to any childhood disease should receive medical attention, even if the child has been vaccinated.

Posted 1 year agoby admin

How should parents talk to their children about HIV and AIDS?

Parents should talk with their children about HIV and AIDS for many reasons, Including: To make sure their children are…

Parents should talk with their children about HIV and AIDS for many reasons,

Including:

  • To make sure their children are getting accurate information that It appropriate for their age; and
  • To help their children learn skills to reduce the risk of becoming infected with HIV and protect themselves later in life.

Parents should look for chances to discuss HIV and AIDS directly with their children before their children are sexually active or experiment with drugs. A good way to approach the subject is to ask children what they are learning about HIV and AIDS in school. Or, parents can use news articles or stories on television, radio, or in the newspaper to start a conversation.

Parents should learn the facts about HIV and AIDS before talking with their children. Health departments, school health teachers, clinics, physicians, AIDS related community organizations, libraries, and the Internet are good resources.

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Do health care providers need to know if a child has HIV?

Yes. Health care providers need to know the HIV status of anyone who they treat in order to give the…

Yes. Health care providers need to know the HIV status of anyone who they treat in order to give the best possible health care. Children with HIV may develop infections and illnesses that require special medical attention. They may need medicines to fight HIV or to prevent HIV-related illnesses. Children with HIV also have a special childhood vaccination schedule.

Posted 1 year agoby admin

Do children get HIV?

Yes. A woman can pass HIV to her baby during pregnancy, delivery, or Breastfeeding. However, there are medicines that a…

Yes. A woman can pass HIV to her baby during pregnancy, delivery, or Breastfeeding. However, there are medicines that a pregnant woman can take to greatly reduce the chance of her baby being born with HIV. These medicines have resulted in a large reduction in the number of babies infected with HIV.

Posted 1 year agoby admin

Can a woman living with HIV pass the virus on to her baby?

Yes. A woman who has HIV can pass the virus to her baby during: Pregnancy Delivery Breastfeeding There are medicines…

Yes. A woman who has HIV can pass the virus to her baby during:

  • Pregnancy
  • Delivery
  • Breastfeeding

There are medicines that a woman living with HIV should take during pregnancy, labor, and delivery to protect her health and greatly reduce the chance that she will pass the virus to her baby. Medication is also given to the infant right after birth and for the first weeks of life. It is very important for all women to know their HIV status before they become pregnant, or very early in their pregnancy, so that they can take full advantage of these medicines and make informed decisions. A second HIV test is also recommended late in the pregnancy to identify if the woman was exposed to HIV during the pregnancy.

Posted 1 year agoby admin