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FAQ

CATEGOTY 3: YOUTH AND HIV

If an adolescent gets tested for HIV, will the parents or guardians be told about the test result?

Parents or guardians will not be told the test result if the adolescent being tested shows capacity to consent to…

Parents or guardians will not be told the test result if the adolescent being tested shows capacity to consent to the HIV test. The laws that protect

Confidentiality of HIV-related information applies, no matter what the person’s age or whether the person has parental consent or parental involvement. There are certain times when a parent or guardian of an adolescent who gave informed consent can be told confidential HIV-related information – for example, if the adolescent is being abused or needs urgent care. If it is best for the adolescent, HIV-related information should be kept strictly confidential.

Posted 1 year agoby admin

Do adolescents/young adults get HIV?

Yes. HIV infection is an important concern for people of all ages, and young adults are no different. The same…

Yes. HIV infection is an important concern for people of all ages, and young adults are no different.

The same behaviors that put adults at risk for HIV also put adolescents at risk. These activities include:

  • Having vaginal, anal, or oral sex without using a condom; or
  • Sharing drug injection equipment.

Adolescents should also be aware of these high-risk situations:

  • Drinking or using drugs. Drugs and alcohol can affect your judgment and lead to unplanned and unprotected sex.
  • Injection drug use, including sharing needles, syringes, cotton, spoons, bottle caps, or any other equipment (“works”).
  • Experiencing “blackouts” – not being able to remember what happened while using alcohol or drugs.
  • Not understanding your own risk of being infected with HIV or your partner’s risk of being infected.
  • Having many sex partners, this increases the chances of having sex with someone who has HIV.
  • Exchanging sex for money, drugs, food, housing, or other things of value.
  • Having sex with older partners, especially partners who use drugs.
  • Having sex with partners you do not know well.
  • Having a history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or having a partner who has a history of STDs.
  • Rape or incest – anyone who has been a victim of rape or incest should seek counseling, including advice about HIV testing.
Posted 1 year agoby admin